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nation that does not -- is not riddled with debt and deficit, but also a nation that continues to be the economic leader in the world. and i believe our plan makes -- protects those investments in those key components of growth. and i hope over the coming hours that we will go through this debate and -- and i know we'll have a spirited period of a lot of amendments. this -- this budget i believe will pass and it will have to then find agreement with our colleagues in the house. and i just want to again commend both the chair and, for that matter, the ranking member. at the end of the day, we have to find common agreement to get this done. this issue that hovers all over of our other debates has become a metaphor as to whether our institutions can if you please in the 2 1*9 century. so just as the chair and rank member found agreement through a markup process where both sides were heard and amendments were offered and debated in a fair and open process, i want to both thank the chair and rank member for their commitment. they have different idead about how we get there, but at t
through a state where wisconsin had faced a multibillion dollar budget deficit, we were having double-digit tax increases, and we saw some of the record job loss that we've seen in the past. so what did we do? we came in and took that deficit, $3.6 billion, and today it's nearly half a billion dollar surplus. we took up -- [applause] we took a state where taxes had gone up, and we not only lowered the overall tax burden for the first time in years, property taxes on a median value home had gone town in each of the last two years. [applause] and when it comes, and when it comes to jobs under my predecessor's term, wisconsin had lost 133,000 jobs, and back in 2010 a survey showed just 10% of our employers thought we were headed in the right direction. today we're gaining jobs and 93% of our employers say wisconsin is heading in the right direction. we can lead with an optimistic message. [applause] simply put, we showed in our election that when people realized the debate was between who do you want in charge, the big government special interests n this case the employee unions, or do y
-point deficit and it tied the game at 69. under two minutes left. clie born drives and makes the bucket. they call the offensive foul. questionable call by the officials. iowa state cannot believe it. instead of a four-point lead it is tied at 75. and then .20 of a second left. the three and are you kidding me? ohio state is on to the sweet 16 for a school record fourth straight year. they will face arizona. second seed miami and illinois. the illini taking advantage of the lack of defense. right to the hoop and late in the game and tied at 52. one hand and jam. it is easy for the illini. down one and a minute left and larkin with the step back three. got it. miami to the sweet 16. they will face market. 63-59 the final. don't see a 12 and 13-seed very often. 6 seconds left and tied at 74. garland banks it in and la salle up 2. ole miss inbounds the ball and from half court for the win and no way. la salle moving on to the sweet 16 for the first time since 1955. 76-74 the final. we will take a brief timeout before we check in on the stanford women. and the good old boys of nascar can't
trillion in debt. we have deficits we can't even wrap our arms around, and they want more of your money. if you were a financial advisor that put you $1 million in debt and ripped through your college savings for your children and all of your checking account and said, just give me more money and we'll solve the problem, would you do it? absolutely not. more than jobs, though, we are also working to save medicare and social security, the commitments that we have made to the american people. so let's take a look here at the big picture. here's a budget breakdown of where we are at right now. look, your eyes are glazed over and we start talking about the trillions of dollars that we spend, but let's take a look at what you pay versus what you expect. this big blue part right here? that's on auto pilot. no adults have come to the table to talk about where we are at today and how to actually save your social security and medicare and medicaid in this big blue part. we are doing that today. house republicans in balancing the budget. but this is what you expect from the federal government. yo
, second seed ohio state and 10th seed iowa state. the 13-point deficit and it tied the game at 69. under two minutes left. clie born drives and makes the bucket. they call the offensive foul. questionable call by the officials. iowa state cannot believe it. instead of a four-point lead it is tied at 75. and then .20 of a second left. the three and are you kidding me? ohio state is on to the sweet 16 for a school record fourth straight year. they will face arizona. second seed miami and illinois. the illini taking advantage of the lack of defense. right to the hoop and late in the game and tied at 52. one hand and jam. it is easy for the illini. down one and a minute left and larkin with the step back three. got it. miami to the sweet 16. they will face market. 63-59 the final. don't see a 12 and 13-seed very often. 6 seconds left and tied at 74. garland banks it in and la salle up 2. ole miss inbounds the ball and from half court for the win and no way. la salle moving on to the sweet 16 for the first time since 1955. 76-74 the final. we will take a brief timeout before we check in on th
the treasury secretary were worried about the long term deficit? does that sound familiar? the fed tightened rates. doing what all the bears say bernanke should do, betting that inflation could rage and rage easily. if the fed stayed even by which is what his critics are saying he should do right now. but when we went down this road in 1937 it sent the economy into an amazing tail spin. causing a recession within a depression. it was an economic calamity that was totally avoidable and the people in power made different, smarter choices. especially the federal reserve. ben bernanke does not want history to repeat itself. he's not going down the path of what the fed did in 1937. he's not stupid. even though that's exactly the path unfortunately that the president and congress are taking. bernanke recognizes that obama and congress have repeated the errors of 1937 down to a tee. he can't let the fed's part in the drama be repeated. otherwise he'd go down as the fed chief that didn't get the economy going and put it back in a recession, a recession in a great depression. only world war ii ended
that passed through the senate really echos what president obama would like to see in terms of deficit reduction but the problem, of course, is when you match up is the senate bill with the house bill. the senate bill calls for deficit reduction through increasing taxes and spending cuts and, of course, the house bill calls for steep cuts in balancing the budget within ten years. of course, some revisions to medicare as well. a lot of differences and we have another deadline coming up. the debt ceiling will have to be revisited this summer, alex. >> looking forward to that. >> reporter: yeah, we all are. >> thank you very much, kristen welker. >>> joining me right now, andy sullivan and ann palmer. ann, i'll begin with you. the president is back from the middle east. the reviews are out there. how are you getting the word in terms of how he was perceived? >> i think one of the key things you can look at is what the israeli press put out in the days following his first steps and throughout the entire visit and it was a resounding applause. he got very good praise from them. obviously fr
struggling? economists point to concern about the debt and deficit. uncertain effects of the obamacare. especially the weight of tax increases. >> it's negative for economic growth overtime. global economy, we compete, with many other nations. part of the competition is taxes. >> conservative critics argue big government fools itself to thinking taxing and spend willing make the economy grow. >> it assumes you take money from the economy right pocket and put in the left pocket and manualicly you more money. >> administration defenders, though, look at it differently. >> under normal circumstances, you don't want the government intervening. in the circumstances where we have the weak demand this is a good time for the government to step in. >> even though who want to spend less would increase spending at lower rate. >> bret: house lawmakers vote down budget proposals as an alternative to g.o.p. plan put forward by paul ryan. senators approved a stop gap spending plan. continuing resolution to keep the government funded after the end of the month. senate has, now it heads to the house. a
to reduce the district's 1 billion-dollar budget deficit. officials say that many of those schools are half empty and that this move will save hundreds of millions of dollars. a louisiana judge is ruling that a new law that bars felons from owning guns violates that state's constitution. residents passing an amendment in november of last year, that challenged law now heads to the supreme court. now for a segment that we like to call what the hill? and you will understand why in just a second it was supposed to be money for the future but 15 years later it's just money down the drain. $24 million in federal funding was spent on a four building complex named after democratic congressman james clyburn. the problem just one building has been built and another 80 million is needed to finish it. that plan to end mail delivery on saturdays just return to served sender. congress has just passed legislation that requires saturday delivery. the postal service planned to stop saturday service lower cost after it lost $16 billion last year. the fbi is trying to figure out how a guy posing as a pilot go
. hold on, mercedes, let's acknowledge what has happened, the deficits have dropped now for 3 straight years at a rate lower -- faster pace than we have seen since the end of world war ii. nobody wants to acknowledge that. but they are coming down because we did have to engage in emergency spenning when the chitanked and we are coming out of that. we have to have balance -- that's good. but what is really good is job creation and a strong economy. we are seeing the effects of austerity. they would trade our economy for theirs in a success. in realtime, as consequence of austerity. >> what do we do? 85% of americans want to see a balanced budget. we are not even anywhere near that with these plans? >> unfortunately, i think when you look at basic fact of the two budget proposals, we are so far apart and we need leadership from the president. we are able to find out what the president's march madness 56 are before we -- before he unveils his budget. again, i think that it really comes -- from president obama to take a lead, to keep meeting with republicans and enable to try to bring the
be in a deficit in 10 years the argument however is that the senate budget creates jobs and economic growth from the middle out. now, that's according to the author. senator pattie murray. for the democrats the vote is a really big accomplishment. >> first of all, over the last two decades the average budget resolution considered 78 amendments. we have done 101. the average vote arama 70 amendments. twice as many. doing this has been a her could herculessen feet. senator murray and senator sessions. >> during the vote senators were facing more than 500 amendments which were filed but 70 were voted on. of course when you do take a 13 hour six minute vote there has to be a little bit of humor. >> it is good to say that as -- as of this time, 5:00 a.m., there has not been a day without a budget being passed in the united states senate. >> and some interesting observations from the vote. all democrats voted yeah with the exception of for up for re-election 2014. unfriendly to democrats. mark beg gich from alaska. baucus from montana. pryor from arc. hagan from north carolina. recently passed the rya
trillion deficits -- that would be the annual difference between what we bring in and what the government spends -- four in a row more than a trillion dollars -- after more than $1.6 trillion in tax increases, after hundreds of billions of dollars worth of new regulations, our country is mired, we are mired in the longest period of high unemployment since the great depression. that is a direct consequence of this huge debt and our creditors' lack of confidence that we're actually serious about dealing with it. indeed, many workers have simply given up on finding work, which is one reason why our labor force participation rate is now at a 32-year low. unemployment's almost 8% but that doesn't take into account the millions of people who have simply given up looking for work after a long period of unemployment. since june 2009, when the recession officially ended, median household income has fallen by more than $2,400. so instead of treading water, the average american family is seeing their buying power decrease by more than $ 2,400 since 2009. at the same time, they're finding not only ar
federal deficits in five years makes it imprudent to jump in with both feet. consider on tuesday paul endorsed a version of immigration reform that would allow the 11 million or so undocumented immigrants in this country to become legal. the week before he defied the hawks in his party to lead a 13-hour filibuster in protest of the obama admission's secretory over its drone war fare program. >> dan senor, you've been involved in republican presidential primaries lately. sorry about that. how would those issues stack up in new hampshire and iowa and south carolina and florida? >> i think the politics, his politics on pure fiscal issues will have tremendous resonance as his father experienced in some primary states and caucus states. i think what is untested is -- from a -- from a political standpoint is his position on foreign policy. his father never really broke through on the neoisolationist politics at the grassroots level beyond a narrow segment of the electorate. rand who i've spent time talking about these issues is much salvier than his father. >> his father blamed in effect u.
. >> the mayor has to do something. they've got a $1 billion budget deficit. so he has to do something. but the problem is, what does he do? at the beginning of the school year, some people are saying they got off easy with just 50 schools, carol. at the beginning of the school year, they said they were going to close potentially 80 to 120 schools. so it's causing issues. there's no money. also, racial issues in the city, because black alderman are saying, we got you elected and now you are closing most of these schools in black neighborhoods on the south and west sides of chicago. and you didn't listen to us. there was no consensus about which areas and which schools should be closed. so it's causing some big issues, beyond money. >> i would suspect that parents are concerned about their children's safety, too. because these children now have to be transported farther to school. they can't go in their own neighborhoods. >> and besides the issue that we have with guns, we can talk about. but, yes, safety, just outside of that issue, where are the resources going to go? which schools? i
to approximately 5 billion euros. because then all your financing are the government deficits. >> adam, thank you so much. >> my pleasure. >> becky, you highlight a really good point. what is very clear from this government and also from the people on the ground that i've spoken with is they absolutely don't want to see a reduction in the sides of the banking system here because they know that is what 50% of the economy and a ton of the jobs, as well. they realize it's going to be a change of livelihood. changes that will happen in this country no matter what are going to be startling to the people here. >> i saw all the headlines coming from russia and the president here making strong comments. is that going to fall on deaf ears in europe? is that not a big deal as far as they're concerned? >> that would be my interpretation, absolutely. would you agree with that, adam? whatever russia says is going to fall on deaf ears when it comes to the troika? >> it doesn't fall on deaf ears. but the europeans have made a categoric statements. cypress has to come up with 5.8 billion euros. it can't be throu
for some tax revenue to help reduce the deficit, calls for some more stimulus, more spending that way. and we're in this funny process where today we will wrap up, i think a little beforehand technically, but we'll wrap up 50 hours of debate and then start the unlimited amendment process. basically, any issue you've ever heard your callers call in and complain about we might see votes on today. it could be stuff like drone strikes against u.s. citizens, and it could be taxes and repealing health care and all these different issues that may come up. the point to remember, though, is this is all adding on to a nonbinding budget resolution. so it's interesting, and it may give people clues as to what appetites there are in the senate to pass or repeal certain elements of policy. but it's not binding right away. >> host: headline in your publication, "the hill," says the senate is poised to pass a budget. do you expect this to pass, and what's the significance? where does it go from here? >> guest: we do expect it. i think the democrats will be able to control the process and get it passe
project 1 billion dollar deficit next year. the closures will save chicago $560 million the next decade. >> whether you do this, mike, in chamucla, florida, or chicago, illinois, this is always excruciating tough for parents and kids, but you got to do it if you're going to keep the budget. >> you have to do it to same some semblance of sanity for a big city like that but you get into where are the displaced kids going to go to schools when the schools are closed? are they going to be bussed? most parents would like their kids to go to a neighborhood school and what happens then? that a huge burden for the mayor now. >> totally. sequestration is complicating it even more. we just did a report that head start across the country is facing these exact challenges and cutting school days and not accepting kids and randomly dropping kids from the program and a disadvantage for kids in that economic status. >> you look at the regional and local papers across the country you see endless stories like this. you look at the national programs and turn on the tv news and where is the white house tou
. here is the next question. is reducing the federal deficit a worthy goal in and of itself? and 85% say yes. 11% say no. it's not just john boehner who said it's not an immediate problem. paul ryan, the face of fiscal responsibility himself this past weekend on one of the sunday shows said not an immediate problem. so americans have gotten the message that it is a problem and that we should be tackling it right now, even though our lawmakers feel it can be down the road a year, five years, whatever we tackle it. >> brian: our next guest has nothing to at to this subject. so i'll move on. >> steve: he does. he's going to -- >> brian: he's coming out of his chair. solar companies were supposed to boost our economy. now evidence they might be tanking our economy. you remember solyndra that cost american taxpayers more than $500 million. turns out it may have a successor. >> steve: months after opening, the oregon based solar panel company, solo power, is facing layoffs, putting 250 million of our taxpayer dollars in jeopardy. apparently stuart varney, we learned nothing from solyndra. >> n
of the well. mrs. shaheen: amendment 438 would establish a deficit neutral reserve fund fupped to protect women's access to health care, including family planning and birth control. it ensures employers cannot deny coverage of contraceptives. we've seen that improving access to preventive care including con troo tra ception is good health -- contraception is good health policy and good economic policy. healthier women and healthier children and healthier families. i urge my colleagues to support the amendment. the presiding officer: the senator is recognized. a senator: every senator supports expanding access to health care. we may have differences on how to it but no one should doubt that commitment. however, we must also ensure we protect deeply held religious beliefs of our citizens. in this regard, the shaheen amendment and the new health care law gets it all wrong. mr. johanns: in addition to growing government and slowing the economy, the law tramples on the rights of individuals. later this afternoon senator fischer will offer a side-by-side to this amendment. now i ask my colleagu
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19